Las Vegas Entertainment

The Vegas Strip Club Hustle Factor

I can always tell when the economy is taking a turn for the worse, because you start running into a higher hustle factor at some of the Vegas strip clubs.  I recently had to remove a major club from my best-of-Vegas list because on recent visits I had found the hustle factor so bad.

In many of the clubs, you’ll see dancers clustered near the entrance, greeting a new customer as he walks through the entry doors and asking him if he’d like a dance.  That’s fine.  But when they won’t take no for an answer, and start badgering him before he’s had a drink or even found a place to sit down, that’s a problem.

If a customer tells this type of dancer he’s just going to have a beer and watch the show for a while, she’ll tell him she can do a lot better show in the VIP.

If he says he doesn’t have the money for that, she’ll try and drag him to the ATM. If he says his bank account’s tapped out, she’ll tell him it’s only $100. Surely he can afford a hundred measly dollars.

If he says $100 is a lot of money to him, she’ll ask him what the hell he’s doing in a strip club. You start feeling like you’re a defendant in court, being attacked by the prosecution.  If he goes back to square one and says he just came to have a beer and watch the show for a while, she’ll insult him for coming to a strip club without more money.

Underlying Causes of the Vegas Strip Club Hustle

Part of the problem is over-hiring.  Some clubs over-hire dancers because they haven’t yet realized that they’re seeing fewer customers, or that customers have less money to spend. Others may over-hire to compensate for the money that’s not coming in the front door by bringing more money in the back door. Since dancers have to pay the house fee to work in a strip club, the more dancers a club hires, the more money the club makes.

When a club over-hires dancers to make up for fewer customers, or customers who are spending less, even the top dancers have a more difficult time eking out a profit

But when a club over-hires dancers to make up for fewer customers, or customers who are spending less, even the top dancers have a more difficult time eking out a profitafter paying the house fee, tipouts, and their other expenses. They’re forced to become more competitive, more aggressive, more hard-sell.

The customers blame the dancers for being too pushy. The dancers blame the clubs for hiring too many girls. The clubs blame the cabbies for charging too much of a head fee.